What Pegman Saw – Mandela Dances

“What Pegman saw” is a weekly challenge based on Google Streetview. Using the location provided, you must write a piece of flash fiction of no more than 150 words. You can read the rules here. You can find today’s location on this page,  from where you can also get the Inlinkz code. This week’s prompt is Free State, South Africa.

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Mandela Dances

“I saw Mandela dance,” said Johnny Kwele, gesturing at the screen behind the bar. “I was there. Look at that joy! He was a god! Apartheid was over.” He sipped his scotch.

“I was a subsistence farmer in Free State. The goldmines paid better, but, well, you know.” I nodded. My recent retirement had taught me the value of freedom.

“One day an ANC boss came from Pretoria, a local boy. They were planning a dairy farm, he said. If we signed up, we’d have a stake, run it as a co-operative. They were going to fly us to India for training.”

He laughed, shook his head.

“Nothing happened. The money disappeared. This country makes a lot of money and none of it reaches the poor.”

“Your leaders are corrupt?”

Johnny glared.

“If you want to know where the money goes, ask your pension fund!”

The image of Mandela danced on.

What Pegman Saw – A good brother

“What Pegman saw” is a weekly challenge based on Google Streetview. Using the location provided, you must write a piece of flash fiction of no more than 150 words. You can read the rules here. You can find today’s location on this page,  from where you can also get the Inlinkz code. This week’s prompt is Botswana.

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© Google Maps

A good brother

“Hold Akashinga’s hand, Maffy. He will look after you until you get to mummy in South Africa.”

Mafirakureva took her thumb out of her mouth and, slipping her sticky fingers into her brother’s hand, she smiled up at her grandma.

Ten-year-old Akashinga stood as tall as he could. He had a backpack containing water and a few sandwiches but his responsibility felt heavier than the pack.

“Climb in,” said the driver to Akashinga. “Put her on your lap.” Akashinga squeezed in beside a plump girl.

They drove for hours across Zimbabwe to the Botswana border. Akashinga watched their driver joking with the border guards as they checked documents.

They’d only travelled a little further when they were stopped at a police checkpoint. The driver swore.

“Everybody sit tight. I’ll talk us through.”

Akashinga put his arms around Maffy.

“Don’t be afraid. I will keep you safe,” he promised.