Friday Fictioneers – Well Done

Every week, Rochelle Wisoff-Fields (thank you, Rochelle!) hosts a flash fiction challenge, to write a complete story, based on a photoprompt, with a beginning, middle and end, in 100 words or less. Post it on your blog, and include the Photoprompt and Inlinkz on your page. Link your story URL. Then the fun starts as you read other peoples’ stories and comment on them!

FF - Well Done - 200222

PHOTO PROMPT © DAWN MILLER

Well Done

The farmer’s son drove the tractor, and the blades of the plough turned the clods like a sexton’s shovel. The empty grain silo coursed with rain.

Winter came, harsh and unyielding. The farmer’s son stayed home, just the whisky bottle for company. Icicles like swords hung from the silo.

Milder weather came. The farmer’s son rose, sighed, and sowed the summer wheat. Day by day the land greened under the gentle sun.

Then the harvest.

The farmer’s son confronted the silo. With an effort of will, he filled it with grain.

“Well done, son,” said the memory of his father.

Inlinkz – click here and join the fun!

38 thoughts on “Friday Fictioneers – Well Done

    • Dear Ali
      Thank you for reading and for your thoughtful comment. I’m very pleased that the sense of continuous hard work came across. The farmer’s son is grieving for his father who died a few months before the story starts. He loves the life – it’s what he was brought up to – but he misses his dad badly.
      With best wishes
      Penny

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Francine
      Thank you for reading and commenting with such insight. You are absolutely right about the man’s burden of grief. In the back story, his father had died in an accident in the grain silo (they’re terribly dangerous places) just a few months before the start of the story. The last line is intended to show that the farmer’s son has started to heal emotionally as a result of faithfully discharging what he sees as his duty to his father.
      With very best wishes
      Penny

      Like

    • Dear Dale
      Thank you for reading and for your very kind comments. You’re right that he wasn’t enjoying that year’s farming, and certainly his dad’s memory spurred him on. In the back story, his father was killed a few months before the story opens in an accident in the silo (they’re dangerous places and people die in them every year). So he’s struggling with grief and misses his dad bitterly. But having successfully completed the year I’m hopeful that he will enjoy the work again – and perhaps he’ll meet a nice girl who will take care of the loneliness!
      With very best wishes
      Penny

      Liked by 1 person

  1. It didn’t seem to me as if the farmer was enjoying his work, although he obviously knew what to do and how to do it. Then you wrote that last line, and it all came clear. Unique, creative response to the prompt.

    Like

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