Friday Fictioneers – We Will Remember Them

Every week, Rochelle Wisoff-Fields (thank you, Rochelle!) hosts a flash fiction challenge, to write a complete story with a beginning, middle and end in 100 words or less. Post it on your blog, and include the Photoprompt and Inlinkz (the blue frog) on your page. Link your story URL. Then the fun starts as you read other peoples’ stories and comment on them!

FF - We will remember them 191010

PHOTO PROMPT © Ted Strutz

 We will remember them

Liz glanced at the clock. Fifteen minutes before her grandson, Oliver, was due to arrive.

She shuffled through the photographs until she found a small, square, monochrome print. Her brother Peter. She had snatched the shot as he entrained for the front in 1940.

Liz shook her head. Peter’s image seemed imprisoned by the margin. The severity of his mouth was belied by his apprehensive eyes.

What else did she have that she could pass on to Oliver?

A single page letter in Peter’s beautiful handwriting. A cutting from the local press, after…

A tear trickled down Liz’s cheek.

The doorbell rang.

 

33 thoughts on “Friday Fictioneers – We Will Remember Them

    • Dear Neil
      Thank you for reading and for your thoughtful and constructive comment. I see what you mean, I think. There are two stories; Peter’s (boards train, goes to France, is killed and his death is reported in the local press; and Oliver’s (comes to his Gran’s house, collects promised photographs) A link between Oliver and Peter would round out Oliver’s story more satisfactorily and link the two stories together. Thanks for the advice!
      With very best wishes
      Penny

      Like

    • Dear Iain
      Thank you for reading and commenting. I wonder whether the passing on of memories depends upon how bad the memories were? My parents were too young to fight in WW2, but they lived through it as children. My mother has described vividly what it was like to watch the Battle of Britain from the ground, under the fighting aircraft. On the other hand, my maternal grandfather served in the medical corps as a stretcher bearer throughout WW1. He only spoke to me once, very briefly, about the experience. I got the impression that it was too appalling to wish to call to mind.
      A kinder world would be nice, though. Let’s keep trying for it!
      With very best wishes
      Penny

      Liked by 2 people

  1. Dear Penny,

    My mother kept a scrapbook when my father was overseas in WWII. I harbor hopes of finding it in the recesses of our cellar. I loved reading their letters and seeing the silly sketches my dad sent to my mom. Lovely legacy she’s passing on to Oliver. Very touching story, my friend. One worthy of lengthening and fleshing out.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Rochelle
      Thank you for reading and for your kind comment. I hope you find the scrapbook in the cellar some day soon.
      I laughed when I read your suggestion that the story is one worth lengthening and fleshing out, because the three characters, Liz, Oliver and Peter are from my novel “Mrs Nightingale’s Song”. There is a scene involving old photographs in the novel, although it’s quite a different story.
      I confess, I wondered whether you’d guessed that!
      Shalom
      Penny

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Reading many of the contributions this week, your story confirms how we seemed to have failed to preserve our family history. What happened to the old records families once kept – now everyone records their lives on the Internet for everyone to see, but it is not as important as a photograph. One that provokes an emotional response – like your story. Nice.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Dear James
      Thank you for reading and commenting. I confess that my family has not been good about archiving photographs. For myself, I’m trying to make sure the digital photos are at least preserved on an external hard drive. It was kind of you to say that my story provokes an emotional response – thank you.
      With very best wishes
      Penny

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Keith
      Thank you for reading and commenting. I’m delighted that you spotted it was two stories in one. In my novel from which these three characters were taken, Oliver’s reaction was delight and satisfaction, because he was an artist collating a record of family portraits. However, he was also conscious of the significance of the photo to Liz.
      With very best wishes
      Penny

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Suzanne
      Thank you for reading and commenting. I think you’re right that Liz will find the right things to say to Oliver – there’s a strong bond between the two of them.
      With very best wishes
      Penny

      Like

  3. Lovely and sad too. Lovely that the memory of Peter will be carried forward, sad that the loss is still so great for her. I do hope Oliver realises the responsibility he’s taking on, being entrusted with those Photos. Lovely story, Penny

    Liked by 1 person

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