What Pegman Saw -Without an Ark

“What Pegman saw” is a weekly challenge based on Google Streetview. Using the location provided, you must write a piece of flash fiction of no more than 150 words. You can read the rules here. You can find today’s location on this page,  from where you can also get the Inlinkz code. This week’s prompt is Manitoba, Canada.

WPS - Without an Ark 190810

Without an ark

“Ninety degrees,” expostulated Marion, mopping her forehead. “Darn climate change!”

“Deep low-pressure area coming our way from Saskatchewan; twister weather. Stay careful and safe, folks!” announced the local radio station.

Marion’s husband, Hank, was back early that afternoon; he’d closed his business, sent the staff home when the severe weather warning had been broadcast.

Clouds were piling up, and there was a blur of rain on the horizon. The sun shone briefly below the clouds.

The rain began to fall, heavy drops, falling faster and faster, a stream of water, a cataract.

Their two children rushed in, bedraggled and sodden.

“Just look at you! Didn’t you see the rain coming?”

Water was pouring across the yard, already inches deep.

“Why, that’s the brightest rainbow I’ve ever seen,” exclaimed Marion, suddenly, then, as abruptly as if a switch had been thrown, the rainbow was gone.

There was a voice.

“Covenant – cancelled.”

 

 

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Friday Fictioneers – No Wonder

I’m still on holiday in Greece, but I can’t resist sneaking some writing time when I should be having a siesta!

Every week, Rochelle Wisoff-Fields (thank you, Rochelle!) hosts a flash fiction challenge, to write a complete story, based on a photoprompt, with a beginning, middle and end, in 100 words or less. Post it on your blog, and include the Photoprompt and Inlinkz (the blue frog) on your page. Link your story URL. Then the fun starts as you read other peoples’ stories and comment on them!

FF - No wonder 190807

Photoprompt © Randy Mazie

No Wonder

When Alan and Judith had moved in, shortly after their wedding, they thought it was the most beautiful house they’d ever seen.

They would often eat breakfast on the terrace, exclaiming with delight at the perfume from the roses in their garden. They would comment in wonder that the distant view was always changing.

But Alan neglected the roses, and Judith was too busy with her friends to be house-proud. Alan spent an increasing number of nights away ‘on business’, while Judith consoled herself with gin.

Now the house is boarded up and empty.

No beauty, no delight.

No wonder.

Blue froggy – join the fun!

Friday Fictioneers – Flying Boat

First of all, my apologies. I’m on holiday in Greece. I hadn’t been intending to write a story today, but when I saw the prompt it fitted so exactly with how I had spent this morning (see below the story) that I couldn’t resist…apologies are due, though, because I probably won’t read many stories by other people.

Every week, Rochelle Wisoff-Fields (thank you, Rochelle!) hosts a flash fiction challenge, to write a complete story, based on a photoprompt, with a beginning, middle and end, in 100 words or less. Post it on your blog, and include the Photoprompt and Inlinkz (the blue frog) on your page. Link your story URL. Then the fun starts as you read other peoples’ stories and comment on them!

FF - Flying Boat 190801

PHOTO PROMPT © Ted Strutz

Flying Boat

It had been many years since he had demonstrated his displacement principle to the tyrant of Syracuse, years filled with achievement, honour and, above all, the satisfaction of his curiosity about the world.

Fire burned, a valve tripped, water flashed into steam in turbines, turning the sails from a windmill. The vessel surged heavily across the water, faster and faster, rising as the air rushed beneath its wings.

Crack!

The sails tattered, the laths from which they were constructed beating the blue water to milky froth.

Archimedes frowned. Materials. The principle was sound. All he needed was better materials.

Author’s note

I visited the Archimedes Museum in Olympia today. It’s devoted to the technology of ancient Greece, and it’s astonishing. If political conditions had been different, the Industrial Revolution would have happened two millennia ago. The story above is (probably) not true, but all the technology was available for Archimedes to make the experiment.

Blue Frog – join the Inlinkz party