Friday Fictioneers – No Go Zone

Every week, Rochelle Wisoff-Fields (thank you, Rochelle!) hosts a flash fiction challenge, to write a complete story, based on a photoprompt, with a beginning, middle and end, in 100 words or less. Post it on your blog, and include the Photoprompt and Inlinkz (the blue frog) on your page. Link your story URL. Then the fun starts as you read other peoples’ stories and comment on them!

FF - No Go Zone 190510

PHOTO PROMPT © Jean L. Hays

No Go Zone

Jessie’s boys knew not to go past the barbed wire. They’d trespassed there once. Within two minutes, a police van and six officers had removed them, and returned them to their parents with a warning letter. Their dad had taken his belt to them for that.

It wasn’t as though there weren’t other places to play. The park in the village, or, a short bus ride away, a beach, or, slightly further, a town with a bowling alley and a cinema.

Still, Jessie couldn’t help worrying. Beyond the hilltop were three concrete domes, soldiers – and a shoot to kill policy.

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41 thoughts on “Friday Fictioneers – No Go Zone

      • I can’t remember ever having gotten a physical~always metaphorical~belt to the butt, but nothing much ever seemed to have deterred me from getting into trouble, if I was determined enough. Alas, now I’m the adult version of that ,too

        Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Francine
      Thank you for reading and commenting. I’m glad you were intrigued by the three domes. They were inspired by the radomes at Fylingdales which were part of NATO’s distant early warning system (the DEW line). They were designed to detect attacks from the communist bloc and naturally were high security and stringently guarded. The photoprompt reminded me of the countryside around the radomes.
      With best wishes
      Penny

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  1. They might need to put up something more than just barbed wire if their trigger fingers are so filled with tension. Kids want to explore. Kids get hurt, or die, just holding a bag of skittles.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Stuart
      Thank you for reading and commenting. There were other deterrents before you reached soldiers using lethal force…but, of course, 100 words precluded their description!
      With best wishes
      Penny

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    • Dear Kalparna
      Thank you for reading and commenting. Yes, that’s what Jessie is afraid of. Dad would have done better to explain to the boys why they should avoid trespassing on the Establishment’s land…
      With best wishes
      Penny

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    • Dear Linda
      Thank you for reading and commenting. Yes, establishments like this must have a very restrictive influence on the surrounding community. BTW the domes are long distance radar to detect missiles as early as possible after launch.
      With very best wishes
      Penny

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Sometimes I wonder if we are doing a disservice to our kids by not telling them our worries. Not that that guarantees they won’t go snooping anyway…
    Well done, leaving us wondering!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Dale
      Thank you for reading and commenting. I think you’re right about giving kids too little explanation. I’ve watched my son bring up his two girls, and ever since they were tiny he’s treated them as rational beings. On the rare occasions he needs them to do as they’re told, they will accept restrictions because he explains why and they’re used to working like that. It impresses the hell out of me, I must say…!
      With best wishes
      Penny

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Suzanne
      Thank you for reading and commenting. I agree that talking to the boys is more likely to be effective. We wouldn’t want boys not to be adventurous, but they have to have boundaries carefully explained, I think!
      With best wishes
      Penny

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Bjorn
      Thank you for reading and commenting. Dystopian – yes – and can you think of a single state that doesn’t hide its deepest secrets behind a shoot to kill policy?
      With best wishes
      Penny

      Like

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