What Pegman Saw – Where the power is

“What Pegman saw” is a weekly challenge based on Google Streetview. Using the location provided, you must write a piece of flash fiction of no more than 150 words. You can read the rules here. You can find today’s location on this page,  from where you can also get the Inlinkz code. This week’s prompt is Golconda Fort, Hyderabad, India.

WPS - Where the power is 181006

Golconda Fort, Hyderabad, India | © Google Maps

Where the power is

It had always been there, like a mountain on the skyline. Blank windows in massive granite walls stared like dead eyes over Hyderabad. The fort was immensely strong and yet was now powerless.

Dushyant’s shirt stuck to his back in the heat. The battered leather briefcase holding his accounts weighed him down. Everything depended on the forthcoming interview. His business, his longed-for marriage to Aarushi – everything.

He glanced at the fort. If the bank didn’t back his business he’d have to go back to being a guide there, telling foreigners of the Qutb Shahis who’d ruled with the power of life and death.

The bank’s silvered windows reflected the bustle of the street.

Dushyant, heart in mouth, presented his accounts.

“They’re on paper?” sneered the Manager. “I can’t waste time on that. I need a spreadsheet. Good day.”

‘This is where the power is now,’ thought Dushyant, and slunk away.

20 thoughts on “What Pegman Saw – Where the power is

    • Dear Abhijit
      Thank you for reading and commenting. As the story doesn’t say whether Dushyant went back to being a guide, or found another source of funds for his business, or, indeed, something else – you, the reader, are free to imagine whichever continuation you prefer!
      With very best wishes
      Penny

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Ivor
      How nice of you to comment in verse! I’ve never had a poem for a comment before! Thank you for that, and for reading the story. Yes, there’s not a lot of difference between today’s rulers and those of previous generations; they all delight in the arbitrary exercise of power. Thank goodness that as a race we have at last legislated internationally against genocide, rape as a weapon of war and slavery. It’s maybe not much, but it’s a start.
      With very best wishes
      Penny

      Liked by 1 person

      • Hi Penny, I often reply in comments with a little verse, it’s a little quirk of mine that I’ve developed/practiced, they are instant writes, and I enjoy what comes out of my head. Quite often they then are used in poems of mine……

        Liked by 1 person

  1. The people in power dictate the terms. Ironic how the banker refuses to waste his own time, but is more than happy to squander Dushyant’s. 😊

    I hope Dushyant’s familiarity with the vacillations of rulers’ whims will allow him to approach this rejection philosophically.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Andi
      Thank you for reading and commenting. As you say, the people in power dictate the terms. For Dushyant, no spreadsheet equals no loan. He’s going to have to transcribe his data into a spreadsheet if he wants the money, and even then it’s not certain a loan will be granted…
      With very best wishes
      Penny

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Wonderfully written. I remember once when I worked at an electronics store. We had a bad storm and power was out. I kept the store open and sold batteries, radios, etc. I kept record of each sale on paper. Sold several thousands of dollars in those two days. When power came back on, I entered into computer. The company I worked for had a freak out. The district manager came and chewed me out. I presented him with the columnar book with each sale meticulously written. He had no clue what it was or what to do with it. I looked back and asked him how he could become a manager without knowing the very basics of accounting. Nearly lost my job… but then, I pointed out that I had made more sales than all the other stores in the district that had power over those two days. He couldn’t argue the profits I’d seen for the company. This story reminded me of that moment.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Jelli
      Thank you for reading and commenting. I love your true story about manual accounting no longer being understood by your manager. Great that you were on the right side with all those sales and profits. They should have given you a bonus!
      With very best wishes
      Penny

      Liked by 1 person

      • A few months later, I was in a car accident that took me a few months to heal enough to go back to work. My reward for working so hard to live was getting fired. Haven’t been able to get a full time job since… that was 22 yrs ago.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. In my epilogue, Dushyant not only learns how to put it into the spreadsheet, he makes the snooty bank manager look dumb when he can’t decipher the advanced spreadsheet features Dushyant uses. And Dushyant and Aarushi live happily ever after.

    Liked by 1 person

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