What Pegman Saw – The rains have come

“What Pegman saw” is a weekly challenge based on Google Streetview. Using the location provided, you must write a piece of flash fiction of no more than 150 words. You can read the rules here. You can find today’s location on this page,  from where you can also get the Inlinkz code. This week’s prompt is Gurara Waterfalls, Nigeria.

WPS - The rains have come 180331

Gurara Waterfalls © Samson Rohan Google Maps

The rains have come

When the storm clouds mass, when the rains come, the river rises. The pure, clear water that chuckles between the rocks becomes a milky brown torrent, sweeping boulders out of its path.

It’s been twelve months since terrorists snatched our daughters. The government has done nothing. We have waited long enough.

“Come, Numilekunoluwa! We must arm the villages. We must find our children and bring them back before it is too late!”

“There are many terrorists. We wouldn’t stand a chance.”

“There are many? We could be more! We must at least try.”

And Numilekunoluwa spoke to Abidugun, and Abidugun spoke to Mobo, and Mobo went to the next village and spoke to them.

And the villages armed themselves, for defence, and to seek for our girls.

Two hundred of us are going into the forest tomorrow.

The storm clouds have massed. The rains have come. The river is rising.

42 thoughts on “What Pegman Saw – The rains have come

  1. what a gloomy, depressing story Penny! A story to wake up. How cruel our world is partly and individual are powerless. But in the crowd we are strong. What a danger, when anger and perfidy, hate and baseness mate and go on a retaliatory march. I think Easter is a good occasion to think that forgiveness is the strength and the only solution for a change to a better. Even if it’s that hard. But one thing is clear, we always reap what we seed. If you are honest and friendly, you will get that back in the long term. If you can love from the heart, you will be loved from the bottom of someone´s heart. Unfortunately, it seems to be, that more people are not able anymore to do so!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Dear anie
      Thank you for reading and commenting. You’re probably aware that I mostly have very similar views to yours about avoiding armed conflict and the need for forgiveness. However, in this case there are complications.
      This is Nigeria, and Islamist terrorists have kidnapped many schoolgirls. There have been at least two occasions when over one hundred girls were taken from a single school. Those girls are alive, and the terrorists are using them as sex slaves. My story is about such a kidnapping. The text is completely clear; the villagers are arming themselves to go to rescue the girls, and to defend themselves if the terrorists retaliate. There’s no question of this being for revenge; it’s rescue.
      Does that change your view?
      With very best wishes
      Penny

      Liked by 2 people

      • Of course you are right Penny. And this fact shows that I am not fit to work in politics or find solutions to serious, complicated problems. I can not take a stand on such things … there are Pat situations in my head … I can not decide. In fact, my feeling tells me that even in the hardest cases, as you describe here, hatred and violence are not the solution, it may just be a relief and, of course, at best a salvation … which must be sought in any case. … but action legitimizes hatred and brutality, which is energetically bad …

        Liked by 2 people

    • Dear anie
      I think your feelings are right. Armed struggle is very rarely the answer. When a river floods, it sweeps away good as well as bad, and leaves mud, damage, loss, and ruined lives.
      With very best wishes
      Penny

      Liked by 2 people

  2. And the current is strong! You knocked it out of the park with this one, Penny. Moving, powerful, and fathoms deep. Like you, I’ve followed these stories on the news and I love how you brought this to life with a hopeful spin.

    I did wonder at the noun-verb pairing in “The government have done nothing”. Small quibble. This is beautiful.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Dear Karen
      Thank you for reading and for your appreciative comment. Thank you, too, for pointing out the noun-verb pairing mistake. I’ve now corrected it.
      I’m honestly not sure how hopeful the spin is. I’m looking forward to reading people’s comments. You’ll see that anie didn’t think the spin was hopeful at all.
      Anyway, I’m very grateful to have your comments and feedback.
      With very best wishes
      Penny

      Liked by 2 people

      • It is interesting how people see it and I’ll be curious too. To me, the fact that the people are uniting–and the fact that they are two hundred strong–is encouraging. Ending on the word “rising” in the context of this united group is what really does it for me. If the river overwhelmed them, and the current swallowed them, it would be another matter entirely. But you are the writer, can you tell us what you intended? 😉

        Liked by 1 person

  3. I wish people in America would give a damn about more than just the popular “protest of the week.” Terrorists are kidnapping girls on the African continent and turning them into sex slaves. Where’s the outrage for that?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear James
      Thank you for reading and commenting. I’m very glad that you care about injustice and inhumanity throughout the world. All you and I can do is stand up for good – and write. Oh – and fund people like Medecins sans Frontieres (Doctors without Borders) who are there on the ground and can make a practical difference.
      With very best wishes
      Penny

      Like

  4. I see so much hope in your story. (I love the transition from clear to muddy waters. I noticed that change in the river’s waters while strolling through pictures and you made the change shine.) People need to unite and rise up against those who have done them wrong. Sadly, it’s the way of things. Nicely done.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Alicia
      Thank you for reading and commenting. I’m glad you loved the transition from clear to muddy waters. We have a river running through the village where I live, and when it has rained heavily the river changes just like that, so I could describe from personal experience. (Ours is only a little river and it doesn’t flood in the village, but it looks very dramatic!)
      With very best wishes
      Penny

      Liked by 2 people

  5. When I first saw the picture the there were all rosy thoughts in my mind on about how I would describe it or make a story out of it, a subtle and short one.

    That’s a whole new perspective you’ve gotten me through, thank you for that. It’s lovely.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Psx:),
      Thank you for reading and commenting. This was one of those rare stories that almost seem to write themselves. The situation of the parents of kidnapped schoolgirls in Nigeria has always seemed desperate to me.
      With very best wishes
      Penny

      Liked by 2 people

  6. Penny. This was so well done. I echo everyone’s various comments. Love how you brought current events into this and the metaphors and the uniting and… well, you can see. I loved it.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Sadly, I disagree with Anie. I fear that those with love in their hearts are not always repaid with love from others – only the lucky ones find love. However, I digress from what I wanted to say about your story, Penny.
    You’ve created something moving, stirring, emotionally charged and yet, I hope – hopeful. I cannot imagine how the families of those stolen girls feel, but I know how I feel when my son is hurt, when I worry for him. Sense leaves me and a feral need to protect kicks in. I don’t believe that violence is a good solution – but occasionally, when fighting an enemy who struck the first blow, who will not be reasoned or bargained with, who has violated and hurt innocent lives, depriving them of the futures they deserve – sadly, yes, it is sometimes the only way.
    Sad, sad story. But very well written, Penny

    Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Lynn
      Thank you for reading and commenting. In discussing the ethics of this fictional situation you pay the story perhaps the biggest possible compliment – it has provoked thought and discussion of a difficult topic. Thank you!
      With very best wishes
      Penny
      PS Perhaps I’d better try and write something upbeat for FF this week! 😉

      Liked by 1 person

    • Oh, I also think that it is hopeful when people unite and care for justice and the river cleans up with violence … even if it is cruel…so maybe human have also sometimes be violent? Nevertheless, I reject human violence. And I do not agree with your love theory. Everyone is repaid with love,…. from their parents, from the people who are close to him. Some people do not feel loved, because they find no partner, and would like to have one. Then they have the perception that they are not loved at all. Unfortunately this perception is often marked by unrequited love for a person whom one adores. Heartache can destroy self-esteem…

      Liked by 2 people

  8. I wrote a book with a plot revolving around terrorism recently and from that can say it takes a lot out of someone to write a story on this topic but this is stunningly written and something that needs to be written about. I applaud your wonderful writing and your braveness,

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s