What Pegman Saw – Strong Stuff

“What Pegman saw” is a weekly challenge based on Google Streetview. Using the 360 degree view of the location provided, you must write a piece of flash fiction of no more than 150 words. You can read the rules here. You can find today’s location on this page,  from where you can also get the Inlinkz code.

WPS - Strong Stuff - Littleton, West Virginia 171007

What Pegman Saw – Strong Stuff

“Chuck, sit down.”

“Gee, Mom, I’m s’posed to be somewhere.”

He sat down anyway.

“Chuck, there’s fifty bucks gone from my purse – don’t lie to me, just keep it. But don’t spend it on drugs. Please, Chuck. I couldn’t bear to lose you.”

“Mom, I start rehab on Wednesday. They’ll give me stuff. I tried cold turkey, remember?”

Mary shuddered. How could she forget the sobbing, the retching, the curses and the prayers?

“Mom. Thanks, OK?”

Chuck hurried to one of the decrepit houses on Main Street. Fifty bucks bought him a packet of white powder.

“Go easy on this,” warned the dealer. “Just take a quarter your normal dose.”

Chuck hid himself further down the street and eyed the drug. Strong, huh? He sighed, “Oh, Mom,” as the shakes quietened and he drifted away.

When he didn’t come home, Mary searched until she found him – and her heart broke.

26 thoughts on “What Pegman Saw – Strong Stuff

    • Dear Lynn
      Thank you for reading and commenting, and especially for your kind words about the dialogue. I was trying to squeeze a lot into it – mentioning theft from a family member, lying, the fact that there was still a strong bond between mom and son – and I was rather worried in case it was too much!
      With best wishes
      Penny

      Liked by 1 person

  1. this was really riveting and super sad.
    and the way you gave us both characters with such depth with such a short piece is brilliant.
    I like the “don’t lie to me” line because it gave us the no nonsense feel for the mom (if I am correct)
    oh and what is even more sobering about this is that rehab was starting soon – I have heard many folks say that a loss came when someone was days away from getting real help.
    anyhow, super sad ending here….

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you for reading, and for your very kind comments, Prior. I wonder if many deaths just before rehab are because – as in this story – the addict doesn’t really believe they can be cured? The thought of what they must go through to be clean must be very daunting – I’m not sure I would have the courage.
      Oh, you’re right about the ‘no-nonsense’ mom. The bit I’m most pleased with, though, is where Chuck says “Mom. Thanks, OK?” He’s acknowledging the theft, and his mother’s forgiveness. He’s setting things right as far as he is able. He’s saying that he loves her.
      Thanks again for your comments.
      Best wishes
      Penny

      Liked by 1 person

      • That’s a great story. There is so much background to each character. Loved this sentence “Mom. Thanks, OK?”. As you said, it speaks lots about the wayward boy.
        A heartbreaking story there Penny. Truly.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Really well told. People sometimes forget that every Chuck started out as a child with a future and often died leaving behind a parent or other significant person who’ll always think of them as that little boy or girl.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Rochelle
      Thank you for reading and commenting. The story of Littleton is tragic; I didn’t have to look far for my plot, unfortunately. Drug dealing seems to be the only profitable enterprise left in the town.
      Shalom
      Penny

      Like

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